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in the climate change summit. china, america, and india still undecided. leaders will get what is needed. india's economy gives it more global clout. we will be looking at what that means when its prime minister meets president obama. the man in charge of britain's iraq war inquiry promises a full account. more than a dozen missing after sunday's disaster in indonesia. officials say the vessel was overloaded. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 11:00 p.m. in the australian capital, where the prime minister has been speaking to the bbc about next month's climate change summit. it is billed as a make or break even the leaders of india, china, and america have not bought their ticket yet. without them, what is possible? >> we're working toward a copenhagen agreement. this is a tough process. forging an agreement across so many different countries is a difficult process. having discussed this atlanta with the prime minister of denmark, the president of the united states, and some discussions with the chinese president, we have the capacity to lead an agreement at copenhagen. one
now public. a memo from america's ambassador to kabul. carl iken barry warns the president not to send more troops without progress by the afghan government in handling corruption, more proof that the president's advisors are split. >> his cabinet is divided. it's taken him a long time to come to this decision and tchaurg time the war -- democrats and those on the left. >> it's a complex decision for the president, whose been getting conflicting advice. on the one side are the skeptics, those not yet convinced more troops should be sent as well as ambassador iken barry, they include joe biden and the president's chief of staff robert emanuel. on the other side those led by general mccrystal, the defense secretary robert gates and hillary clinton are also on his side. one issue around which they all unite, president karzai must change. >> i think that the corruption issue really goes to the heart of whether the people of afghanistan feel that the government is on their side, is working for them. >> the president thereof make that decision sooner rather than later. the longer he leaves i
is about. we're gointoo around the world to see what ssons we can learn fix america's sick, sick health care system. i' covered the world as a foreign correspondent, andight now i'm writing a book abo health carsystems seas. firsst on my tour is great britain, wre our family lived for five years even thougthe uk is our closest ropean ally, its alth ce solution that is, the vernment-run national health service-- may seem to close to soclism for most aman still, we can len something here. for about half of what we pa per person, the nhcovers everybodand s mewh tter health isti, longer lifexptancower iant mortaly. britain's national healt servicis dicatedo the oposition that you should never have to pay medical bill. the nhs, there's no insuran premium,o co-pay, fee at l. the system covers evybody. and, you kno when we lived here, my family got really gd care from the nhs, althoh we often had to wait to see doctor. and yet thwspars here are full of nhrrortories-- raoning, waiting lists, terrible mistake so i've come to london to e th nhs. is it an answer for the u., or just some horrle so
want you to listen. >> we liberated more than 25 million afghans. now america and our 25 nato allies and 17 partner nations are standing with the afghan people as they defend their free society. the enemy is determined. the terrain is harsh and the battle is difficult, but our coalition will stay in this fight. we will not let the taliban or al qaeda return to power, and afghanistan will never again be a safe haven for terrorists. >> president bush acknowledged then that the incoming administration faced a volatile situations in several hot spots, especially along afghanistan's border with pakistan. well, for more than 20 years he endured a private hell. doctors thought he was in a coma, but he was cautioonscious along unable to speak and now he tells cnn about his nightmare. as seven suspects are charged with a terror incident in mumbai, last year's terror attacks could have been worse. meet one man who might have served thousands of train travelers that day. >>> and is it a bird or a plane? well, no, some say it's a rocket man trying to do what no other man trying to do what no oth
are going to vote on a bill which to me the people of america don't like. and you know who doesn't like it the most? seniors. you know why? they're concerned. they know medicare is being -- is going broke, and by the year 017, there will be $500 billion of cuts in medicare. and yet, the money that's being cut from medicare isn't being used to save medicare. it's to start a whole new program that's going to cause americans who have insurance to pay more. it's going to cause people that don't have any insurance to make it harder to get, or if they go to an emergency room, have to pay more, that bill is going to be higher. all because of what i believe is an irresponsible piece of legislation that is going to be a huge weight on our american economy at a time when you have 10.2% unemployment. but i see the senator from nevada has -- he has a similar copy of the bills next to him and he may want to chime in on what he is seeing in his home state and what he is hearing from people who live in nevada and the small businesses as well as the hospitals and providers. mr. ensign: if the senator w
what lessons we can learn to fix america's sick, sick health care system. i've covered the world as a foreign correspondent, and right now i'm writing a book about health care systems overseas. first stop on my tour is great britain, where our family lived for five years. even though the uk is our closest european ally, its health care solution that is, the government-run national health service-- may seem too close to socialism for most americans. still, we can learn something here. for about half of what we pay per person, the nhs covers everybody and has somewhat better health statistics, longer life expectancy, lower infant mortality. britain's national health service is dedicated to the proposition that you should never have to pay a medical bill. in the nhs, there's no insurance premium, no co-pay, no fee at all. the system covers everybody. and, you know, when we lived here, my family got really good care from the nhs, although we often had to wait to see a doctor. and yet the newspapers here are full of nhs horror stories-- rationing, waiting lists, terrible mistakes. so
to every d-lister in a leopard skin fez. america is a great country and we need not constantly tied ourselves. they are the ones who whipped themselves in the back, not us. bill: the white house says it was not a bow you are saying what? >> i do not want to get into what it is. >> it depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is. >> he was dressed like sergeant hillary clinton and then down to his hips. whatever you want to call that -- sergeant bilko and then down to his hips. whatever you want to call that -- why doesn't he bowed to the queen, for god's sakes? >> hello. bill: oprah and his wife are with barack obama tomorrow. what do you think? >> listen, i do not have any trouble. i think harry truman pulled the pan on the grenade in hiroshima on his way back from potsdam. he can do the same on air force one or zero proposal plane. o proposal was probably nicer. -- oprah's was probably nicer than air force one. get ready to be deemed racist. bill: you agree with me. get the olympics for chicago. it is a good thing for america. it is popular overseas. he can do whatever he wants
as a public service by america's cable companies. coming up this thanksgiving day, director steven spielberg received the liberty medal at the national constitution center. then, remarks from the former undersecretary of defense, paul wolfowitz on the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. after that, political strategists assess the new obama administration as he nears his first year in office. friday, for the first time in british history, parliament opens its chambers to non-mp's as they debate in the house of commons. former new york times reporter at what has to his plagiarism. a look back to the cuban missile crisis, as well. also, have world threats been over-the post cold war world. sunday, two programs on democracy and the internet, including the university of virginia powell on how the political process has been affected by the internet. the facebook founder will talk about how networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> thanksgiving week and on c- span, american icons, three nights of cspan original documentaries on the iconic homes o
will start off asking your reaction to comments by columnist who asks, could america go broke? the number -- host: you can reach us at twitter, c-spanwj is how you can do that. and you can e-mail us, it journal@c-span.org. and if you have called any of the c-span program in the last 30 days give someone else a chance. first, a look at the legislative business of the week. health care legislation gets teed up in the house. the front-page headline of "roll call." they write getting to the vote will require leaders to hurtle hangups over abortion and immigration language, moderates gripes on the overall cost of the bill, liberal demands for symbolic votes and their preferred provisions. also an unknown are re of parochial concerns. writing about the legislation coming up. host: that sent "will call." we will talk about this week and next week -- but our question this morning is more broadly on spending, based on a column that "could america go broke?" he writes this morning that the idea of a major advance country would default on its debt -- host: we will get more comments from this column
for debate. how many people in america know that the reason we are here is because the republicans don't even want to bring the bill to the floor for debate and amendment. while, that's their right under the rules of the senate is their right. they can filibuster, deily, obstruct. they can say no. but just as surely as that is their right it is our responsibility as democrats to move this bill forward. i would remind my colleagues on the other side of the ogle that last year voters overwhelmingly voted for barack obama to lead changes, to make changes, and one of the changes he campaigned so hard for most changes in the health care system. and just as surely voters elected democrats to majorities, big majorities in the house and senate to do the same thing so it's our responsibility to lead. and that's what we are doing now by bringing this bill to the floor. we are taking another giant step toward fulfilling the mandate, the mandate the people of this country gave to president obama and the democratic party last november to undertake a comprehensive reform of america's health care system. an
dedicated funding to cover all of new york city's added security costs? >> i think that is fair. america was attack on september the 11th. that was of national consequence. although the trial will be hosted in new york, it seems to me that new york should not bear the burden alone. this is a national -- >> so you will recommend, and i presume, fight for these funds from omb which we know sometimes has other things on its mind. >> with your help -- >> you have my full and undivided help. i just don't want mayor bloomberg, the commissioner. they didn't make the decision, but they stepped up to the plate and willingly agreed. i don't think either they or new york city, new york state should be left hanging out there paying any of the costs of this, and i take it you fully agree with that. >> i don't disagree with that at all. >> okay. second question, and just one other thing on this. there may be other costs that we can't envision, and i take it we're wanot going to find someby saying this wasn't in an original application or on an original request. i take it there will be flexibility and
minister of great britain, gordon brown and the secretary of state of the united states of america, hillary clinton, the president of the republic ofçó france, nicolas sarkozy, the chancellor of the federal republic of germany, angela merkel. the president of germany. medvedev, the russian president. the vice chancellor to have federal republic of germany and heads of state of government from all over europe. welcome to berlin. >> this is where the walls stood. today we commemorate the many people who died at the wall. every single victim has a special place in our hearts. when the wall came down on november 9, 1989, berlin cried tears of joy. people were dancing on top of the wall. since then a place of horror has become a place of freedom. tonight, we are celebrating a major festival of freedom. together we will watch it is a dominos are toppled. a big word of thanks to the more than 15,000 predominantly young people from around the world who have imstraited these dominos. each stone expresses a yearning for peace. quite a special dom annoy has reached us from -- domino has reached us f
and hospitals struck to get it for their patients. i'm shannon bream, america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin with the historic vote in the house late last night. it took a visit from president bam become and a deal with the pro-life members to the caucus, but the democrats were able to win the late night passage of the massive healthcare bill. caroline shively is standing by with the latest. hi, caroline. >> hi to you, shannon. democrats pass with reform bill with 220 cevote. listen to the cheers when they reached 218 the bear minimum for passage. [ applause ] that cheer is for a ten-year trillion-dollar plus measure that is a sweeping overhaul of a healthcare system. 219 democrats voted for the bill, and so did one republican, congressman joseph gal. a first termer who holds overwhelmingly democratic seat in new orleans. 176 republicans and 39 democrats voted against it. it aimed to cover 96% of americans. those who don't get insurance face a fine. it has large companies to offer coverage or face a fine. creates a public option where the gover
challengesacing america's future. and adtional funding is provided by the following supporters- > hello and good evening. i'm ljit dhaliwal. imagine here in the united stes that they held vote to ban a wel-known religious symbol, the spe of a church, t's say, because some fel threatened by it. well, at has happened in switrland where voters have approved ban on the building of minarets,he towershat are a typical pa of mosques. the vote in a nationa referendum was57% for the ban, which was aimed at stopping further islamition in switzerland, in t words of the naonalist party that supported it. but the vote was widely criticized by islamic groups today. anfrance's foreign minter called it an expression of intolerance. tonight's "lead focus the controversl swiss move and analysis oit beginningith jane dodge of it >> reporter: tre are only four of them in switzerland, but that's four tooany acording to thecountry'slargest pay. and now it seems t swiss public agrees. in a result that surprisedmany, 57% of voteoted a ban on the building of minarets. the country's f right sss ople's party who are behin
to our viewers in pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up later for you -- and illegal raid under the cover of darkness. why heritage groups are trying to prevent fragments from the past from disappearing forever. and the giants indelicacy that fetched a mouthwatering some at an auction -- eight giant -- a gienat delicacy. hello. it has been a day of celebration and remembering, and the once divided city of berlin, and the heart of the once divided continent of europe. in its 28 years the berlin wall signified repression and fear but on this night in 1989 the first crossing point opened and berliners surged through, effectively marking the end of a communist empire. worrell leaders gathered in the pouring rain at the brandenburg gate to mark the moment. >> and new generation celebrating freedom and the end of the world order they never knew. the berlin wall to these children just something from the history books or recollections of their parents and grandparents. my find them, world leaders striding through the brandenburg gate, once the border between east and west berlin.
to america, london and. -- paris, remembering the end of world war i. angela merkel becomes the first german chancellor honoring armistice day in france. president obama inches closer to a new strategy. brazil blacked out chaos as a power failure plunged rio and sao paulo into darkness. tribute to thegerman goalkeeper robert enke who died after being hit by a trained. a suspected suicide. >> is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london and 1:00 in the afternoon in paris where angela merkel remembered history by making history. she has become the first german sandler to attend a armistice day celebration in france. one of several around the world. in lonn between attended a church service, the first time it occurred without the presence of surviving veterans. today's ceremonies at poignancy as they take place against the backdrop of the conflict in afghanistan. >> it is 91 years cents but guns fell silent in the great war and for the first time the leaders of france and germany came to mark this day of commemoration together. under the arc de tree of nicolas sarkozy and angela merkel reinforc
, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following suppo- >>> hello and good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal. and welcome to a special edition of "worldfocus." for dedes, it stood as the symbol of the cold war. built in 1961, the berlin wall was the line in the sand where western democracy ended and communist rule began. then suddenly, 20 years ago today, it was gone. today, on the anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall, world leaders gathered in berlin, led by german chancellor angela merkel, france's nicolas sarkozy, britain's gordon brown, russia's dmitry medvedev and u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton crossed the former border between east and west berlin underneath the historic brandenburg gate. ordinary germans also turned out by the thousands, placing flowers and candles in the remembrance of the 136 people who perished trying to cross the divide. our german partner, the broadcaster deutsche welle has our "lead focus" tonight, taking us back to the rapidly unfolding eve
medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. ♪ when black friday comes >>> good morning, america. this morning, cha-ching. that's the sound retailers are hoping to hear on this black friday. we'll tell you how the sellers are planning to lure you in the stores. and where you can find the best deals right now. >>> a young american vanishes in europe. and his parents frantically plead for help. what happened? how did he disappear from one moment to the next? we hear from his father. >>> new details on the white house party-crashers. the secret service launches a massive investigation to get to the bottom of the security breach. and in a "gma" exclusive, we asked two long-time friends if the couple in question is addicted to the spotlight. >>> a startling, new medical study out warns that the number of diabetics will double in the next 25 years. and the cost of caring for them could triple. what to do to protect yourself. ♪ i'm dreaming >>> and dreaming of a white house christmas. what's more than 18 feet tall and 1,500 pounds? the white house christmas tree. this morning, we have
before i leave. there's some really good news for america out here on the job front and clean energy. two weeks ago on the microsoft campus out in washington state i drove a ford focus which will probably be the first american mass-produced all elk trick vehicle. this car is the bomb. when americans get an all electric car and understand how much torque an all electric car can generate, these things are like -- this is the fastest car since i was in my buddy's chevy 404 in 1968. when you hit the pedal, it's not a gas pedal, the accelerator, they'll still call it a gas pedal, unbelievable power is generated because an electric engine gives you immediate torque, internal combustion engine you have the pistons. electricity is immediate torque. everybody's been talking about electric cars because they are so efficient they can wean 9 oil addiction which is so dangerous to us. they can reduce global warming. what americans are going to really love is how fast they are and the acceleration you get from them. that's going to be a real fun thing about them. the good news is we now have an opport
challenges facing america's future. additional funding is provided by the following supporters >>> hello and good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal. when president obama arrived in japan todaon the first stop of his first trip to asia, he came face to face with a man not unlike himself. a new leader who swept into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghani
and in many -- and not to, i mean, america's not free of any responsibility in pakistan's lack of development by supporting military dictatorships and what not. so the conversations with the elite were too easily predictable, if you will. and i think that when i first arrived in pakistan, a woman o said to me, a very conspiracy-hawking anti-american woman -- >> host: your sponsor, by the way. >> guest: the irony of that, of course. she said, there's no way that you, you know, there's no way that you is going to understand pakistan because you don't speak the language, you don't dress locally, you don't ever leave islamabad. a year later when i would rather speak with the tea boys at my office than the other fellows who were working at this institute, and she said, she came up to me and said there's no way you can be a journalist. you speak urdu, you dress locally, so you must be doing something else. >> host: wherever there's plumbing the cia does get blamed. [laughter] i think it essentially was right, nick. sometimes word fails us, vocabulary doesn't reach. but you could call
for more information on the triple solution on healthier american, visit for a healthier america.com. see you next time for your health. captioning sponsored by cbs and johnson & johnson, where quality products for the american family have been a tradition for generations. >> osgood: good morning. i'm charles osgood and this is sunday morning. of all the questions facing our country there's one in particular that touches us in an immediate and personal way. it involves the h1n1 flu vaccine. many perplexed americans, the question comes down to this. is the vaccine really a healthy choice? there's no shortage of opinion on this question. it's not just medical experts who are having their say. tracy smith will be reporting our cover story. >> about 15 minutes we'll start. thank you very much. >> reporter: millions have taken the h1n1 vaccine. but there are millions more who doubt they want it or even need it. what do you think is more infectious, h1n1 or fear? >> i think fear is the most infectious thing on the planet at the moment. i'm hoping it's not the most dangerous but i could
of new jobs in secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america but in the meantime we are looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at the white house state briefing that i hosted with lisa jackson the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefings we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area for funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to investing in committees to help demaris fanta climate related disease, to slashing greenhouse gas emissions and are owned buildings. this is not an afterthought for my department. this is a key part of our broader health strategy. wore and more we understand that health is not something that happens justin doctors' offices. whether you are healthier not depends on what you eat and drink, what e bright, how you get around and where you live. a world that is heating up and powered by coal-fired plants that filled the sky with harmful greenhouse gas is going to have fewer healthy people
world news," broadcast for our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- in portugal, it looks that it will be likely to allow same-sex marriages. and crumbling man is grabs -- manuscripts left behind in timbuktu. hello to you. six decades after the second world war, what could be the last major nazi war crimes trial has started in munich. john demjanjuk was born in ukraine and is now 89 years old. he's accused of helping lead thousands of people in to the gas chambers in poland. his family and then say he is too frail to face justice. our correspondent is in court. >> he is accused of mass murder, but he could not even walk into the courtroom. 89-year-old john demjanjuk went to trial today, as photographers crowded around him. it felt more like a freak show than a war crimes trial. >> it was like the first day when the whole world will learn more details. >> more than a quarter of a million jews were murdered in the death camp. he was a former red army soldier who volunteered to work as a guard here after being captured by the
did make this pledge - >> i will not risk your lives unless it is necessary to america's vital inrest. and if it isnecessary, the united states of americaill have your back. >> forore on president obama's japan trip, we're joined by an expert on u.s.apan relations wi medley globa advisers which provides economic and politica analysis toinancial compies. thank you r joinings on the progra >> thank you f having me. >> talk about the chlenges th japan's new ldership faces. are they pure economic? >> well, there's economic. there' a great challenge, there'a huge debt burden piled up. but they ned to ensure growth. the new government wts to transform jap from an econo that's basically driven by experts to one thas driven more by domestic demand especially consption, which is a grt challenge. it's a good idea, actually, but how it's going toe done, i n't think they figuredt ou and thenthere are iues, a number of foreign policy questis, especially the relationship with the unit states which has been jolted a little bit. >> let's talk a little bit about the relationship do you think thatt is
room. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and elsewhere around the globe. coming up later,italy's ingenious invention to help keep the swine flu at bay, and stepping into the spotlight. kenya's fashion designers make the most of a new surge in demand. hello to you. in pakistan, pressure to contain a bloody insurgency, a warning that american and afghan troops are not doing enough to keep their borders and security and it threatens to destabilize both countries and the wider region. officers told the bbc that taliban militants from pakistan are making regular forays into afghanistan to r-arm and returning to carry on the tax back home. we have this report. >> it has been a long war, it is not over yet. for more than one year, pakistani troops have been pounding taliban troops. they say the battle may never end. its troops in afghanistan. we were taken to a valley area, the latest battlefield. on the far side of the peaks, the afghan province. commanders complain the taliban to get re-armed over there because american and afghan forces do not stop
world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up, keeping swine flu at bay. and stepping into the spotlight, kenya's fashion designers make use of the surge in demand. >>> hello. in music, spoken word, countries around the globe have been marking armistice day, the end of world war room and one in 1918. with current conflicts in mind, there was striking visual reminder of how far europe has come. for the first time, french and german leaders stood side by side to honor the fallen. >> it is 91 years since the guns fell silent and the great war. for the first time, the leaders of france and germany came to mark this day of commemoration together. under the arctic triumph, nicolas sarkozy and angela merkel reinforced their friendship. two days ago, the french president was in berlin for the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. >> the end of the first world war and the fall of the berlin wall remind us that we must always fight for the valuable goods of peace and freedom, that we need to defend the values with democracy and human rights, and we keep
wld news. broaast to our viewers on bbc in america also around the globe. my name is mike emory. >> coming up laterrers an illegal raidundercover of darkness. wh troops are trying to prevent fragments of te past from disaparing forever. >> and t giant del cassie that fetched a moh-watering sum at auction. >> hlo to you. it'seen a day ofelebration and rembrance in the once divided city of berlint the art of the once divided ntinent of europe. in is 28 years the berlin wall signified repression and fr. but on this night in989, the first crosng point opened and berlinerssurged tough. effectivy marking the end of a come uniist empir works have gathered in pouring rain at thebrandenberg gate to mark remembran. bbc world news reporter >> a new generati cebrating freedom and the end of a world order they ner knew. theberlin wall to these childrenjust something fromthe story books or from the recollections of their parents and andparents. behind them world leaders stridg through the braenberg gate, onc the border between east and west berlin. politician --politicians joing thousands rem
who understand what it is all about and the whole gist of the conversation is that america is going to go on continuing to be the preeminent worldç power. perhaps challenged but we are going to keep on doing pretty much the way we have done it. do you suppose that barack ob ç obama, in these five sessions that he has hadi] in the last f weeks over the future policy in afghanistan, has brought in anybody who asks the question, what is it going to cost? and is this accountant willing to pay thoseç costs to maintai this kind of international policy into the foreseeable futu future? >> one more question.ç >> i'm a graduate student of the politics department. my question is similar to the last two and gets back to the theme of the lastç panel whichs strategic lessons learned. i was intrigued by professor zelikow's comments that after 9/11 the lesson learned was decisive actionç was decisivel rewarded and the threat emerges deal with it now and chop off its head now, take care of it before it gets any worse. and while you didn't explicitly say what the lesson was of çç, my
>>> barack obama making the first presidential trip to asia. he says america needs to improve alliances there. you'll hear how he thinks that will affect you. >>> he had a heart attack after a marathon and technically died. well now, he's alive to talk about it. hear what doctors did to revive him after 40 minutes. >> five, four, three, two, one. >> set an emotional record-setting domino effect. wait until you hear how many tiles they set up for their shining moment. >>> hey, there. thanks for having us over. this is hln "news and views," this is virginia cha. president obama is now in singapore. he will meet with leaders of apec. before leaving japan, he said the u.s. needs to work closer with japan. he also said there are other tough things to deal with. >> this is a place where the risk of a nuclear arms race threatens the security of the wider world, and where extremists who defile a great religion plan attacks on both of our continents. there can be no solution to our energy security and our climate challenge without the rising powers and developing nations of the asia pa
. thank you to the united states of america. especially in berlin, we can experience the fall of the will drastically change the lives of our people. many made use of new opportunity but we remember those who lost their jobs and lost a sense of belonging in a new system. they have our support and their accomplishments also deserve our respect. 20 years after the fall of the berlin will wall, a lot has been accomplished, but a lot of work remains to be done. those who agreed today, let me tell you. remember november 9, 1989. we were hugging each other then and we were the happiest nation on the earth. when we keep this in mind, this puts our problems into perspective. i think we can be proud of what people have accomplished in west and east germany together over the past 20 years. the peaceful revolution of 1989 shows what brave people can achieve. this should be our warning and our mission. it is up to us to at least create holes in the walls separating the rich and poor. through consistent efforts, we can preserve natural support systems for all people. it is up to us to crea
first? caller: i'm concerned about jobs in america. we have two parties. the republican party, supporting free trade to send all our jobs offshore. the democratic party supports bringing illegal immigrants into the country to take whatever jobs are left. whichever party we are voting for, we are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going
down the road? >> well, first of all, most people in america who don't want this, so to be the people to defeat itould be popular. ed something important. 60% to 80% of the things we talk about in health care could have passed the house last night 400-20, but instead the democrat leadership chose not to stop there but to try to cram down the country's throat a government-run health care system. a cbo congressional budget office says it is going to drive up health insurance premiums. the american people thought the idea was to get control of the cost. $500 billion cuts in medicare, states like mississippi and pennsylvania are going to be forced to raise our taxes because part of the cost of this is being dumped on us. there are lots of things in here that most americans don't want. i don't believe the senate will pa, but, yeah, we could have a very good health care reform bill that would pass overwhelmingly, but about ten things in here wouldn't be included. >> governor rendell, if you talk in terms of what health care means, if premiums do go up, if the middle class does feel a tax hi
any other group in america. i am in support of this public option. i tried to think of any other time in our history that we were so divided over an issue. we have so many congressman taking money from the insurance industry. in the civil war, southern states congressmen work make of -- made up of plantation owners and made money off the cotton industry. they did not want government coming between them and their cotton pickers. these men convinced poor white southerners to own slaves so they could keep getting richer. guest: we have seen a rapid decline. 15 years ago, there were 50% more people covered with health care insurance when it was provided by small businesses. every year, more and more employees and small-business owners are getting cut. they are getting cut because it is more and more expensive. it is just as exorbitant. it is never that high when it comes. every eight years, it doubles. á÷we have to put -- i am happy that there are more and more institutions that are shedding light. i can showing where members of congress receive their campaign contributions is a great w
students who shared their secrets with keeping america great. but our own becky quick had a chance to walk around the campus with these two legends in a day. we're going to share some of those most insightful comments with you. >> i know you spend a lot of time focusing and studying on all kinds of events, including diseases going around the world and i'm dying to ask you a question. would you have your kids get the h1n1 vaccination? >> sure. as that becomes available, i think everybody should have it. >> today, novartis is cutting to ribbon on the company's first cell vax even making plant. these are cheaper and faster to make than using eggs. our own mike huckman is there until the research area this morning. mike. >> reporter: good morning to you, steve thp the afternoon, more than 200 employees, executives and dignitaries, including the ceo of novartis, the secretary of health and human services and the governor of north carolina will be here to formally open this state of the art first of its kind facility in the united states. it's located in holly springs, just outside of raleigh. n
.m. eastern, the white house -- inside america's most famous home. beyond the velvet ropes a public course, our visit shows the grand public places as well as those rarely seen spaces, and saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, the capitol -- the history, art, and architecture of one of america's most symbolic structures. now, a senate confirmation hearing for two treasury department nominees. committee members get a chance to question the administration's choices for a deputy under secretary and assistant treasury secretary. senator max baucus of montana state -- chairs the finance committee. just under an hour. >> the hearing will come to order. let me begin by saying chairman baucus could not be with us this morning because he is with his mother who is ill in montana, and we want to send our best from all the members of the committee to senator baucus and his mother, and we are hoping for hearse with recovery -- for her swift recovery. we're looking for to the time that senator baucus comes back to resume the chairmanship of this committee. we have a hearing this morning for a number of nominee
... with reform that includes the best ideas. backed by america's physicians. nurse leaders and nurse practitioners. america's hospitals. prohibiting cuts to medicare benefits. protecting your choice of health care professional. covering preventive care, and closing the prescription gap, to reduce out-of-pocket costs. ♪ eggland's best. in my kitchen, i love eggland's best. that's why they're the only eggs... i make for my son. the chef. eggland's best. the better egg. >>> many veterans can tell extraordinary stories of their time on the battle front and often they're not so much about the actual fighting as about the difficult decisions that they had to make about life and death and trying to find harmony in the midst of the terrible time. photo journal john torlgoe went to utah to hear the song of a long lost war. >> i have a 70-year-old trumpet. it's been with me on all my combat missions all through world war ii. i never went any place without it. here we are, marjorie rogers, she and i have been married now 68 years. we finally got this p-47. it was a dream to fly. that's why i
vote, because i believe that the debt can bake america. >> to get even this far, it appears that the straight might have spread money around california congressman jim constance said his vote could be con contingent on getting help for building schools in his area, and the congressman explained he had been offered the dollars he was looking for. >> he responded to me by basically say thatting that did not like many of the elements that were in the legislation. however, he was able to procure $120 million for the university of california medical school. >> there is another wrinkle in all this. speaker pelosi secured the votes of 40 anti-abortion democrats by allowing them a vote on an amendment putting tight restrictions on abortion for anyone getting federal subsidies. it enrageed those who oppose abortion benefits a you this is a disappointing distraction from the bill before us. >> the pro life amendment passes and if speaker pelosi hadn't allowed the vote, she would have lost as many as 40 more democrats and the bill would have failed, but now several pro choice lawmakers
year on, are just appalled by what was happening to the possibility, the promise of america. at the end of the interview, he believes that barack obama, in the capacity for dialogue that obama represents is a very good choice for this country, and he did have a chance to meet with president obama, i believe, in washington at a private meeting and also when obama was in moscow in july for a summit meeting with medvedev. host: albuquerque, independent caller, go ahead. caller: thank you so much for c- span's. i have the most profound suspect for you. i am a subscriber, and i have been for at least 10 years. i feel like i had been around reconstruction with all that has transpired in the last decade. i just finished reading your article in the latest "nation." obama's faithful choice. i hope that you will touch on that a bit, your thoughts on afghanistan. i hope and pray that at some point in the near future i will the gathering of the funds to be joining you on one of your nation cruises and have the pleasure of shaking your hand and a meeting some of my other well-respected figures such
: rihanna told her horrific story to diane sawyer earlier tonight on abc's "2020." "good morning america" showed portion of the interview early this morning. >> listening to her voice, it was shaking at times. you knew how painful it was for her to recount this. >> reporter: the a-list couple were attending pre-grammy parties. but things took a violent turn. the two were driving in brown's rented lamborghini when rihanna says she saw a text message that a woman had sent chris brown. >> i couldn't take that he kept lying to me, he couldn't take that i wouldn't drop it. it escalated in him being violent towards me. and it was ugly. >> reporter: ugly is an understatement. police documents say that during the argument, brown punched rihanna, shoved her head against window, bit her, placed her in a headlock and told her, quote, now i'm really going to kill you. >> he had no, no soul in his eyes. just blank. he was clearly blacked out. there was no person when i looked at him. my next option was to get out of the car and walk, start walking in a gown and a bloody face. >> reporter: rihanna was
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